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Is the Michael Jackson skin pigmentation disease realistic?

Is the Michael Jackson skin pigmentation disease realistic?


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Quoting wikipedia:

Jackson's skin had been a medium-brown color for the entire duration of his youth, but starting in the mid-1980s, it gradually grew paler. The change gained widespread media coverage, including rumors that he might be bleaching his skin. According to J. Randy Taraborrelli's biography, in 1986, Jackson was diagnosed with vitiligo and lupus; the vitiligo partially lightened his skin, and the lupus was in remission; both illnesses made him sensitive to sunlight. The treatments he used for his condition further lightened his skin tone, and, with the application of pancake makeup to even out blotches, he could appear very pale. Jackson was also diagnosed with vitiligo in his autopsy.

1) Is this plausible?

2) Is it likely to be an actual disease, or would there be so many mitigating factors that it is unlikely a person would suffer to the extent he did?


1) Is this plausible?

It is absolutely plausible. His particular condition was called Vitiligo (as stated in your quote) and isn't that uncommon, albeit not usually as severe.

Skin pigmentation expression changes over time, sometimes dramatically.

2) Is it likely to be an actual disease, or would there be so many mitigating factors that it is unlikely a person would suffer to the extent he did?

Vitiligo is a very well-documented disease, and like every disease, there's a broad range of affectation. Treatments options are very limited, and so makeup or other methods are often used to disguise the affected skin.

Here's some more pictures of people with Vitiligo at varying stages:


Is the Michael Jackson skin pigmentation disease realistic? - Biology

The Genetics and Evolution of Skin Color: The Case of Desiree's Baby
Developed by Patricia Schneider. Copyright 2003 National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. Used with permission.

Grade Levels: 9-14
Subject Matter: Biology, Physical Anthropology, Genetics
Time Allotment: 1-2 class sessions
Description: This lesson plan explores the genetics and evolution of skin color, using a short story by Kate Chopin called "Desiree's Baby" as a starting point.

Patricia Schneider teaches at Queensboro Community College in Bayside, NY. This lesson plan was developed for the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts as part of the Case Studies in Science Workshop held at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, on June 10-14, 2002.

Students will explore the genetics of skin color and theories about its evolution by pondering the mysteries of Kate Chopin's short story "Desiree's Baby," which was first published in 1893. It is a story of race and gender in antebellum Louisiana. Desiree is deeply in love with her husband, Armand, and he is a loving husband and a proud father until he notices their infant's dark skin. Because Desiree was abandoned as a child, her ancestry is unknown. Armand concludes that she is not white and tells her to leave. His rejection drives Desiree to take her own life and that of the baby. In the last line of the story, Armand discovers that he is also of mixed ancestry.

Students read the story and then discuss a set of questions about genetics probing the puzzle of how Desiree's baby can have a darker skin color than either Desiree or the baby's father, Armand. Students then use an AaBbCc Punnett Square to explore polygenetic skin color inheritance. Finally, students will read assigned background articles and write an analytical essay scrutinizing various theories accounting for the evolution of different skin colors.

The case was developed for urban community college students in their first semester of general biology. The course curriculum is organized around the general theme of evolution. By the time the case is introduced, students have covered evolution, biochemistry, cell biology, and Mendelian genetics. The case is also appropriate for anthropology and biology courses for non-majors.

allele
melanin
polygenetic
genotype
phenotype
gamete
epistasis
Punnett square
Albinism
homozygote
heterozygote

  • RACE - The Power of an IllusionEpisode 1: The Difference Between Us (on video or DVD)
  • "Desiree's Baby" and other handouts (below)
  • "Skin Deep" article by Nina Jablonski and George Chaplin in the October 2002 issue of Scientific American
  • Explain polygenetic inheritance
  • Describe the inheritance of skin color
  • Discuss the "sunscreen" and "vitamin" hypotheses of skin color evolution
  • Write a short essay summarizing the key points in a popular science article

The short story and the accompanying three parts of the case were designed to be presented using the progressive disclosure method (for more information on this method, also known as the Interrupted Case Method, see http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/projects/cases/coots/coots_prologue.html)

    Distribute copies of the short story Desiree's Baby (Handout #1) as a reading assignment.

Part II: Skin Color is a Polygenetic (Multiple Gene) Trait (20 minutes)

  1. Display the following skin color inheritance chart for the class by copying it onto the chalkboard or using a computer projector or overhead transparency.

The following Punnett square shows the possible offspring from a cross between two individuals of intermediate skin color.

AaBbCc X AaBbCc
(each square shows the number of dark skin alleles in the genotype)

Gametes ABC ABc AbC Abc aBC aBc abC abc
ABC 6
AABBCC
5
AABBCc
5
AABbCC
4
AABbCc
5
AaBBCC
4
AaBBCc
4
AaBbCC
3
AaBbCc
ABc 5
AABBCc
4
AABBcc
4
AABbCc
3
AABbcc
4
AaBBCc
3
AaBBcc
3
AaBbCc
2
AaBbcc
AbC 5
AABbCC
4
AABbCc
4
AAbbCC
3
AAbbCc
4
AaBbCC
3
AaBbCc
3
AabbCC
2
AabbCc
Abc 4
AABbCc
3
AABbcc
3
AAbbCc
2
AAbbcc
3
AaBbCc
2
AaBbcc
2
AabbCc
1
Aabbcc
aBC 5
AaBBCC
4
AaBBCc
4
AaBbCC
3
AaBbCc
4
aaBBCC
3
aaBBCc
3
aaBbCC
2
aaBbCc
aBc 4
AaBBCc
3
AaBBcc
3
AaBbCc
2
AaBbcc
3
aaBBCc
2
aaBBcc
2
aaBbCc
1
aaBbcc
abC 4
AaBbCC
3
AaBbCc
3
AabbCC
2
AabbCc
3
aaBbCC
2
aaBbCc
2
aabbCC
1
aabbCc
abc 3
AaBbCc
2
AaBbcc
2
AabbCc
1
Aabbcc
2
aaBbCc
1
aaBbcc
1
aabbCc
0
aabbcc

The offspring of this cross exhibit seven shades of skin color
based on the number of dark skin alleles in each genotype.

    Distribute Handout #2 and ask the students (working in small groups) to determine the number of offspring with each skin color. If time permits, have them use the number of offspring with each skin shade to plot a bell-shaped curve on the chalkboard.

Students sometimes raise the issue of Michael Jackson's skin color. He is said to suffer from viteligo, an autoimmune disorder that destroys melanin producing cells.

Part III: Evolution of Skin Color

    Begin this part of the lesson by showing the following video, which explores the science of human variation:

RACE - The Power of an Illusion, Episode 1: The Difference Between Us.

If you only have time to screen the segment on skin color, begin the video at 23:41 (with Stephen Jay Gould saying: "My favorite trivia question in baseball. ") and play through 28:03 (ends with Joseph Graves saying: "Oh, this is the place where we go from the light race to the dark race. "). If you are using the DVD, go to scene 8.

(To further explore how race is socially constructed, see Episode 3: The House We Live In. Note that in this episode (DVD Scene 7), historian James Horton describes how southern states had different laws defining who is "black," so that some individuals could literally change race by crossing state boundaries.)

Using details on the evolution of skin color from the Jablonski/Chaplin article, write an essay in your own words that discusses both the "sunscreen" and "vitamin" hypotheses and answers the following question:

The Sorting People section of this Web site is an interactive game allowing students to experience the diversity of skin colors and other traits across "racial" groups. Click here to open a new window and access the game or point your students to www.pbs.org/race. Click on "Learn More" then "Sorting People" then "Explore Racial Traits."

Students can be evaluated according to their class participation and their essay can be graded using a holistic scale (Bean, 1996). Individual learning can also be assessed on the next unit exam by questions pertaining to the genetic and evolutionary principles emphasized in the short story, the scientific articles, the written assignment, and class discussions.

An answer key to the questions posed in this lesson is available to teachers via the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science (NCCSTS) website. In order to access the answer key, you will first need to obtain a password from the NCCSTS. To do this, complete the application form at http://www.sciencecases.org/register.asp. Please allow 3-4 business days for a response.

Polygenetic Inheritance

One of the reasons why Mendel was so successful in working out the basic principles of heredity was that he studied simple traits. He chose traits in the garden pea, which appeared in two distinctly contrasting (either-or) forms, e.g., tall vs. short plants, yellow vs. green pods, and smooth vs. wrinkled seeds. A single gene controls each of these traits. Few characteristics follow this simple pattern of inheritance. Most traits result from the additive effect of many genes mediated by the environment. These polygenetic traits are characterized by small gradations in phenotype, known as continuous variation. Graphing the distribution of one of these traits produces a bell-shaped curve in which extreme values are much rarer than intermediate values. Environmental factors influence the expression of polygenetic traits - e.g., poor nutrition limits height, sun exposure darkens skin color.

Inheritance of Skin Color

Skin color is largely determined by the amount of melanin. Dark-skinned individuals produce more melanin than light-skinned individuals. At least three genes regulate the amount of melanin produced. Each gene has two forms: dark skin allele (A, B, and C) and light skin allele (a, b, and c). Neither allele is completely dominant to the other, and heterozygotes exhibit an intermediate phenotype (incomplete dominance). Each dark skin allele in the genotype adds pigment by increasing melanin production. There are seven different shades of skin color ranging from very light (aabbcc) to very dark (AABBC) most individuals have the intermediate skin color (AaBbCc). A cross between two individuals with intermediate skin color produces offspring with a range of phenotypes (bell-shaped curve).

Evolution of Human Skin Color

It appears that our earliest modern human ancestors (Homo sapien sapiens), who lived 100 - 150,000 years ago in eastern Africa, had dark skin to protect them against the deleterious effects of ultraviolet radiation. Many scientists used to believe that dark pigmentation evolved in Africa as a "sunscreen" to protect against skin cancer. However, this could not be the only selective pressure since most deaths from skin cancer occur only after reproductive age. According to the most recent theory, different skin colors evolved to ensure reproductive success by regulating the production of two critical vitamins.

Ultraviolet radiation (UV) catalyzes the synthesis of vitamin D, which is required for absorption of calcium and development of the skeleton. Vitamin D deficiency can lead to rickets, a crippling bone disease. But overexposure to UV radiation will break down vitamin B folate (folic acid), which is necessary for fetal neural development and fertility. Anthropologist Nina Jablonski theorizes that dark skin evolved near the equator. There, UV radiation penetration is high enough to stimulate vitamin D production while the dark skin protects against the breakdown of folate. Light skin evolved when early humans migrated to the high latitudes where UV radiation is much lower. The amount of melanin gradually decreased to facilitate vitamin D synthesis under low UV conditions. Today, as a result of recent migrations, many individuals do not live in the climate for which their skin is adapted. Dark-skinned people in high latitudes can get their vitamin D from sources like fish, while light-skinned people in the tropics can protect against folate breakdown by covering up with clothing.

Allman, W.F. 2002. Eve Explained: How Ancient Humans Spread Across the Earth. http://dsc.discovery.com/convergence/realeve/feature/feature.html

Campbell, N.A., and J.B. Reece. 2002. Biology (6th ed). San Francisco, CA: Benjamin Cummings.

Cummings, M.R. 2003. Human Heredity, Principles and Issues (6th ed). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning.

Goodman, A.H. 2000. Why Genes Don't Count (for Racial Differences in Health). American Journal of Public Health, 90(11):1699-1702.

Holden, C. 1991. New Center to Study Therapies and Ethnicity. Science 251(4995):748.

Jablonski, N.J., and G. Chaplin. 2002. Skin Deep. Scientific American 278(4):74-81.

Jablonski, N.J., and G. Chaplin. 2000. The Evolution of Human Skin Coloration. Journal of Human Evolution 39(1):57-106.

Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. National Center for Biotechnolgy Information (NCBI). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/

Solomon, E.P., L.R. Berg, and D.W. Martin. 2002. Biology (6th ed). Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning. Pacific Grove, CA.

Bean, J.C. 1996. Engaging Ideas: The Professor's Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

From Mid-Continent Research for Learning and Education at http://www.mcrel.org/

Life Sciences Standard 4 Level IV (Grades 9-12):

Knows ways in which genes (segments of DNA molecules) may be altered and combined to create genetic variation within a species (e.g., recombination of genetic material mutations errors in copying genetic material during cell division)

Knows that new heritable characteristics can only result from new combinations of existing genes or from mutations of genes in an organism's sex cells other changes in an organism cannot be passed on

Knows that mutations and new gene combinations may have positive, negative, or no effects on the organism


There’s no doubt that Michael Jackson’s biography makes for some interesting reading, if not for the many tragic twists and turns involved. One area of his story that many people find interesting is his alleged to have gone under the surgeon’s knife. While he confirmed some surgeries did take place, Jackson always denied the number of procedures most people alleged and that photos from over the years seem to make obvious. While we may never know the whole truth behind Michael Jackson and plastic surgery, we can definitely take a look at the possible story.

What Are Michael Jackson Plastic Surgery Procedures?

If we are observing his pictures, it is possible that he has had numerous plastic surgery procedures such as a nose job (Rhinoplasty), cheek implants and skin bleaching as well.

Nose Jobs (Rhinoplasty)

The only part of the Michael Jackson cosmetic enhancement chronicles the singer ever confirmed was his nose jobs. Jackson confessed to having had two of them over the course of his life. However, this was something that people found out about without his confession. Over the years, Jackson’s nose changed radically. Eventually, the result was a much thinner version that turned upwards at the tip.

According to Jackson, however, the augmentation was purely pragmatic and had nothing to do with looks. He said that his new nose gave him better access to oxygen and, thus, made it much easier to hit the high notes—something that would be important for a singer of his stature, but that has never been confirmed as a realistic supposition by any surgeon.

Michael Jackson Before & After

Other Facial Features

While a nose job could be attributed to wanting to improve his singing, other changes would be purely cosmetic. It appears as though Jackson had a cleft put in his chin, for example. He also apparently had cheek implants inserted as well. Again, taking one look at his earlier years shows an almost unrecognizable face.

Much has also been made about Michael Jackson’s skin color. Over the years, it changed radically as well, even more so than his nose. Jackson was African American after all and one look at the rest of his family shows they had a dark brown skin tone, not at all uncommon for that ethnicity.

However, in the mid-80s, Jackson’s skin color began to change. Gradually, it became paler and paler. Eventually, rumors spread that he must be bleaching his skin in order to turn it white. He always denied these rumors, however, and instead insisted that he was the victim of a rare skin condition. While he had been diagnosed with a skin disease called vitiligo, at least one Michael Jackson biographer has claimed this ailment could actually be the result of skin bleaching methods. It may have also been that vitiligo lightened his skin some and his attempts to even out the color with makeup only made matters worse.

We’ll never know for sure how much Michael Jackson plastic surgery rumors are actually true. Sadly, he passed away before much could ever be learned about the famous singer who eventually withdrew from public life. However, many sources close to him have claimed the singer probably received close to a dozen surgeries over the course of two years and always in a clandestine manner.


Michael Jackson's Skin

From what I've been told and contrary to popular belief, Michael Jackson did not make his skin white because he didn't want to be black. He sufferred from a medical condition called vitiligo which apparently can only be treated by making the entire skin white.

Vetiligo: "An autoimmune skin disorder caused by attack of the immune system on the pigment-producing cells within the skin. The loss of the cells responsible for skin color result in milky white patches on the skin surface"

I believe that he opted to have all of his skin white rather than have white patches here and there.

Crumbles, I've heard the same thing, though with celebrity rumors, it's always difficult to really know the full truth. When I heard about the vitiligo, my suspicion was that it was the reason behind Michael Jackson's signature glove on one hand. It probably started to appear on his hand and prompted him to don a glove to hide it.

I don't actually know what his children look like, I've never seen them pictured without veils of some sort covering them. If they are light-skinned, that likely is because their mother has light skin, combined with keeping them covered so completely when outside, which would keep them from getting tanned at all.

I really don't know how Michael Jackson has gone about getting his skin lighter. If you find out somewhere what was used, perhaps we can figure out how it works.

Some seem to think that he used a prescription drug called Benoquin to get rid of all dark that was left of his skin so he would have uniform skin colour. (How true it all is, I can't tell!) If you click here http://itsb.ucsf.edu/

vcr/Freeze2.html [Broken] and scroll down to a post by David Finkelstein, it says:


Michael Jackson Biography

Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009) was an American singer, dancer, entertainer, and recording artist. Michael Jackson epitomised the era of pop in the 70s, 80s and 90s, earning himself the title the King of Pop. He remained a global icon until his untimely death in 2009.

Michael Jackson began his music career alongside his fellow brothers and family members in the Jackson Five. His career began in 1964, aged only six. The group, led by Jackson’s father, worked hard touring many clubs and bars performing their mix of Motown hits. They gained the attention of record labels and in 1968 signed with Motown records. It was the youngest, baby-faced Jackson, that caught the eye of reviewers. Rolling Stone magazine wrote that Michael was a ‘prodigy’ with ‘overwhelming musical gifts’. Michael stood out for his exceptional enthusiasm and soft, infectious musical voice. The group produced four number one hit singles, including “I Want You Back“, ABC and “the Lover You Save.”

Despite achieving his goal to be a music performer, Michael’s childhood was far from happy. He was regularly beaten and threatened by his authoritarian father. This legacy of abuse left Michael scarred throughout his adult life.

Solo Career Michael Jackson

By the late 1970s, Michael was increasingly looking to pursue a solo career. With the help of music producer, Quincy Jones, Michael produced the solo album ‘Off The Wall‘. The album was a great success, eventually selling over 20 million copies. The album gained much critical acclaim, and Michael secured the highest royalty rate in the music industry. (37% of album profit)

His second solo album, Thriller, launched Michael Jackson into a position as the most famous pop singer in the world. With little commercial advertising and promotion, Thriller rose to number one on album sales and remained at the number one spot for a total of 37 weeks. It gained one of many Guinness World Records for Michael Jackson, attaining 110 million global sales and 29 million sales in the US. Thriller included number one hits such as Beat It, Billie Jean.

Michael Jackson with the Reagans

In March 1983, Michael Jackson performed live on Motown 25, ‘Yesterday, today, forever’, – a TV special. He performed his distinctive and memorable dance move – the Moonwalk. In the dance routine, he effortlessly moves backwards with seemingly keeping one leg perfectly straight. His performance made him a global icon of not just music, but dance. Michael Jackson pioneered the importance of music video in promoting a pop artist. This iconic performance has been compared to the famous Beatles’ appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1964.

Jackson’s next albums were Bad (1987) and Dangerous (1991). His final album was Invincible (2001).

By the late 80s, there was an increasing number of stories speculating on Jackson’s personal life, health and physical appearance. Michael Jackson underwent numerous operations of plastic surgery to fix his nose and add a dimple in his chin. During the 1980s, his skin started to lighten this was due to a rare skin pigment disease, but it didn’t stop a wave of speculative press stories that he was bleaching his skin colour. The press covered a range of speculative stories about Michael Jackson, including imaginary stories Michael had invented himself (such as sleeping in an oxygen tent to avoid the ageing process)

“I’ve been in the entertainment industry since I was six-years-old, and as Charles Dickens would say, “It’s been the best of times, the worst of times.” But I would not change my career… While some have made deliberate attempts to hurt me, I take it in stride because I have a loving family, a strong faith and wonderful friends and fans who have, and continue, to support me.”

The press attention made Michael increasingly reclusive, spending much of his time in his ‘Never Land’ ranch.

Speaking on the Oprah Winfrey show, Jackson addressed the issue of skin colour change:

“OK, number one. There, as I know of, there is no such thing as skin bleaching…I have a skin disorder that destroys the pigmentation of the skin, it’s something that I cannot help, OK? But, when people make up stories that I don’t want to be who I am, it hurts me…it’s a problem for me, I can’t control it.”

He married Lisa Marie Presley in 1994 it lasted two years though they remained friendly after the divorce. In 1996, he married Deborah Rowe in Sydney. Together they had two children. They divorced in 1999 and Rowe gave full custody of children to Jackson.

Allegations of child abuse were first raised in the 1980s and re-appeared in the 1990s. This led to the trial of The People v Jackson on 31 Jan 2005, in Sante Maria, California. After five months of high publicity, Jackson was acquitted. Though the experience left him physically weak and emotionally stressed. He departed America for the Persian Gulf Island of Bahrain.

“The minute I started breaking the all-time record in record sales—I broke Elvis’s records, I broke Beatles records—the minute it became the all-time best-selling album in the history of the Guinness Book of World Records, overnight they called me a freak. They called me a homosexual. They called me a child molester. They said I bleached my skin. They made everything to turn the public against me.”

– Remarks at National Action Network headquarters (9 July 2002)

Towards the end of his life, he was increasingly plagued by money troubles and ill health. He increasingly became dependent on a variety of drugs, which was said to have contributed to his ill health and premature death. Despite concerns over finance, he is said to have made career earnings of $500m and had assets in Sony/ATV Music Publishing catalogue worth over $300m alone.

“In a world filled with hate, we must still dare to hope. In a world filled with anger, we must still dare to comfort. In a world filled with despair, we must still dare to dream. And in a world filled with distrust, we must still dare to believe”

– M. Jackson Quoted by CNN June 2009.

Michael Jackson died on 25 June 2009, at a rented mansion in the district of Los Angeles.

Citation: Pettinger, Tejvan. “Biography of Michael Jackson”, Oxford, UK. www.biographyonline.net , 28th Jul 2010. Updated 11th February 2018.

Charity Work of Michael Jackson

  • Michael Jackson supported many charities. This included a burns charity in Culver City, California. This followed an incident where Michael Jackson was burnt in filming a Pepsi commercial in 1984.
  • He also supported HIV / AIDS charities at a time when it was still unfashionable.
  • In 1984, he received an award from President Ronald Reagan for his support of charities which help overcome alcohol and drug abuse.
  • From his 1984, Victory Tour he donated all funds (around $8million to charity)
  • In 1985, he also co-wrote the charity single “We are the World” with Lionel Richie. It sold over 30 million copies, and the proceeds were sent to the poor in the US and Africa.
  • He continued his charity work to the end of his life supporting charity concerts such as Aid for victims of Kosovo war.

The Essential Michael Jackson

The Creative Life and Work of Michael Jackson

Related pages

Famous Americans – Great Americans from the Founding Fathers to modern civil rights activists. Including presidents, authors, musicians, entrepreneurs and businessmen. Featuring Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Madonna, Oprah Winfrey.

Musicians – Famous musicians from classical music to popular music. Including Mozart, Beethoven, Bach and John Lennon.


The Big Picture

Whether it turns out that he died of heart disease, a cocktail of potent prescription drugs or just years of indulgence and excess, one verdict is inescapable -- what really killed Michael Jackson was an overdose of showbiz values. Like so many child stars before him, from Judy Garland and Sammy Davis Jr. to Tatum O'Neal and River Phoenix and Lindsay Lohan, with about a thousand fifteen-minute one-hit wonders in between, Jackson never found himself a home in the real world.

For Jackson, like so many child stars, show business was his safe haven, the place that shaped his hopes and his dreams, only to drag him into a hellish black hole of unquenchable ego gratification, anxiety, vanity, arrested development, strange obsessions and rampant insecurity. It happens every day -- just look at how oh-so-many Hollywood types measure their self-worth by their weekend grosses, but it's always worst when you find yourself on the cover of Rolling Stone when you're 10. Although his father ruled the family with an iron fist, from the time Michael wasن he was the acknowledged star of his family's burgeoning music empire, displaying the kind of exhilarating stage persona that helped make the Jacksonم Motown's last great crossover music act.

It came out only later that Michael bitterly resented being the family meal ticket. Bullied by his father -- he called him his Bad Daddy -- teased by his brothers, who made fun of his big nose, which Michael quickly set about whittling away to practically nothing -- he was, like so many child stars, robbed of any real childhood. He had no friends, only handlers. His only validation was the applause and the acclaim. That's the problem with child stardom -- too often, your only fundamental values are showbiz values, the smell of the greasepaint, the roar of the crowd and the amount of zeroes in the grosses.

When your life is defined by showbiz success, you develop a huge hole in your soul, a hole that often gets filled with drugs, booze or other self-destructive behavior. It happens with depressing regularity, whether to O'Neal (who won an Oscar at 10, then descended into a prolonged battle with drugs), Drew Barrymore (booze at 11, coke at 14), Lohan (a Disney star at 12 before a steep descent into DUI arrests, coke and rehab), Macaulay Culkin (from "Home Alone" stardom to abuse of prescription pills) and Corey Feldman (the young star of "Goonies" who quickly became a poster boy for booze, drugs and excess). Not everyone survives, with Phoenix dying of a speedball overdose at 23 and Brad Renfro succumbing to a heroin OD at 25.

Could anything have saved Jackson from his untimely end? Keep reading:

 Jackson had plenty of struggles with drugs, becoming addicted to painkillers in the 1990s, ending with him going into rehab to recover. It's no surprise why so many child stars disappear down the drug-riddled rabbit hole. The drugs are simply a convenient substitute for the real rush -- the heady intoxication of fame and adulation. Instead of developing a strong inner self and a realistic approach to the world, people like Jackson retreat into fantasy, where they can indulge their fantasies without grappling with reality.

Perhaps his need for fantasy explains why Jackson was so obsessed with older stars from past eras, most famously Elizabeth Taylor, since stardom was the only lifestyle he could really relate to. It was his fascination with Elvis Presley that perhaps led to his bizarre marriage to Lisa Marie Presley, who had plenty of experience -- via her own father -- dealing with an unhinged, narcissistic recluse. The marriage lasted only two years, but she did get Jackson into rehab after he was buffeted by allegations of sexual abuse with a 13-year-old child. It's all too indicative of the dysfunction inside the Jackson clan that La Toya Jackson accused Michael of being a pedophile, then later retracted the statement after the damage was done.

As Hitsville blogger Bill Wyman wrote on Friday, there are eerie similarities between Jackson and Elvis, two hugely influential cultural icons who ended up increasingly cut off from reality, living in the utterly remote fabricated dreamscapes of Graceland and Neverland. As Wyman writes: "Both were man-boys with infantile sexualities and pre-adolescent images of themselves. . Both changed from impossibly beautiful youths into ravaged adults, Presley bloated and dazed, Jackson self-mutilated almost beyond recognition." 

Although many of today's former child stars seem utterly lacking in self-control, much less self-awareness, Jackson was different. For all his unbridled Wacko Jacko narcissism, when it came to his craft, he had steely discipline, clearly having put in Malcolm Gladwell's requisite 10,000 hours of practice rehearsing and refining his moves, starting with his childhood days in the Motown machine. But it soon became apparent that -- as a prisoner of showbiz -- Jackson's artistic ambitions were overwhelmed by his desire for money and fame and all the trappings that went with it. He was, after all, the man who demanded that the media refer to him as the King of Pop.

One of the most revealing accounts of Jackson's maniacal quest for material gain and awards is found in "Howling at the Moon," a memoir by former CBS Records chief Walter Yetnikoff, who ran the label when Jackson was having his huge hits. Yetnikoff recalls Jackson bemoaning that he'd never had a childhood. "All he knew was singing and performing," Yetnikoff says. "His focus was on his career and career alone. 'Understand,' he told me. 'that I was a star when I was six.' Sometimes I felt that he was still six. I wasn't sure he could name the president of the United States. He had no social skills. He was a child who sought the company of other children. He only sought my company because I was the man who controlled the hype machine."

To Jackson, everything was a numbers game. Artistic validity was nice, but what he really craved what selling the most records and landing the most Grammys. Like many people in showbiz, he measured his success against the accomplishments of his peers and rivals. It's a soul-destroying game, but it's how the game is played in Hollywood. 

After Jackson's "Off the Wall" album won only a single Grammy, despite selling millions of albums, he called Yetnikoff to complain. The personality change was abrupt, from fragile artist to cold-eyed competitor. "Michael's high, inaudible voice changes tone when he's unhappy," Yetnikoff said. "He becomes an angry little boy who won't be happy until he gets all the candy in the candy jar. 'Mine was the first solo album to have four Top Ten singles,' he said. 'That means I should get at least four Grammys.' "

Yetnikoff told him to be happy with one. He wasn't. But the next time out, ' Thriller' won a dozen Grammys for Jackson and producer Quincy Jones. Yetnikoff says Jackson still wasn't happy -- he wanted all the Grammys for himself. It must have been awful for Jackson, in his later years, to see all that success slip away, since success was really all he lived for. It's hard to know what was in his head as he tried to reboot his career one last time, middle-aged and obviously frail, out of touch with the pop currents of the day, yet still desperate for one more grab at the brass ring, one more moment at the top.

His downfall is hardly unique. It happens in show business all the time, the insecurity and the neediness overwhelming genuine talent because that talent, especially when ripened at an early age, is so often smothered by the absence of any real self-worth. For Michael, everything was skin deep, from his plastic surgery and skin color alterations to his strange costumes and gauze masks. Inside, he was a sad, hollow shell. He was the embodiment of the oldest showbiz fable of them all, that underneath all the tinsel, lies more tinsel. 

Photo: Michael Jackson in 2007. Credit: AP Photo / Danny Moloshok


Animals with rare skin condition may help people

What did the late pop star Michael Jackson have in common with water buffaloes? An incurable skin disorder called vitiligo. In the uncommon condition, sufferers lose pigmentation and their skin turns blotchy. Vitiligo’s cause is a mystery, though autoimmune disorders may play a role in some cases. Stymieing research has been the lack of a good animal model. Now, scientists appear to have found one: the water buffalo. Four years ago, vitiligo researchers in New Delhi heard an odd tale from social workers. Villagers in a hamlet in western India were shunning buffaloes with blotchy bellies. They hauled back five of the pariah beasts last year (one pictured above), and found through skin biopsies that whitened patches of the buffaloes’ skin bore a “striking resemblance” to that of human vitiligo patients. Just like in people, the buffaloes’ blotches had vanishingly few melanocytes—pigment-bearing cells—and low levels of expression of pigmentation genes, the team reports online in the journal Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research. The New Delhi team hasn’t wasted any time making use of the new animal model. In one buffalo, patches have spread “confetti-like” from the animal’s tail to its rump and face in just 6 months researchers are testing a new compound to see whether they can arrest further spread.


This Is Why Michael Jackson’s Children Look White, They Are Actually His Biological Children (in depth details & pics)

Many question the paternity of Michael Jackson’s children if not all three kids, they question the maternity of the first two kids he had with Debbie Rowe because of the skin color of his children. This article will be explaining how Michael’s kids could have white skin color, have blue eyes, and still be very much related to the King of Pop.

First, it is important that Michael Jackson although he’s married the mother of his first to kids, he only did that to spite his first wife, Lisa Marie Presley who openly said in an interview that they were still together four years after they got divorced around which time Michael’s firstborn, Prince was conceived. This means that Michael probably only got together with Debbie Rowe (Mother of his first two kids) to have kids. In an interview, Michael stated that he wanted kids with Lisa Marie. However, she wasn’t interested in having kids and this led to a rift between them.

While contesting for full custody of her kids, Debbie Rowe mentioned that she and Michael never actually had sexual intercourse to have his first two kids. Although the two were married, she had to go to the “Office” (Medical clinic) and get artificially inseminated which means Michael wasn’t exactly interested in affection with Debbie all he wanted was kids. So there is no point getting into such an elaborate skim just to have another man’s kids. From the looks of things, all Michael had to do was donate his Sperm which seems pretty easy considering that he was an active man who knew he could have kids. Though Debbie Rowe is the biological mother of Prince and Paris Jackson, his third child Blanket was from surrogacy and the identity of the surrogate is unknown.

So if these kids are his how come they have white skin color?

Blanket is the only one who looks like Michael and even he has a white skin color. The issue of biracial kids is on that varies from family to family. A look at some of the Jackson’s kids will convince you that a black family who has associated a long time with white people can produce white-looking kids. This can be seen from some of Michael’s nephews and grandnephews. Not to look far, Michael’s sister Janet had a son recently and he looks as though he is a white Kid just as Blanket, Paris, and prince look.

Let’s also consider Meghan Markle, her skin color, and features. Should we say she is adopted because she looks white? Many who question the paternity of Michael’s children never fully consider the idea of biracial kids like Rasheeda Jones who look completely white. A side by side picture of Rasheeda and Paris, their skin color looks exactly the same. So what makes Rasheeda Jones who is biracial more black than Paris Jackson who is also Biracial.

It’s actually perfectly normal for biracial children to look as though they are 100 percent Caucasians. Here are some examples:

Lina Horn- African American

Mariah Carey- African American.

Joline Ivy -African American.

Let’s look at pictures of Michael’s kids and one would find that his first son prince has Vitiligo the same disease that tampered with Michael’s skin color. It’s no coincidence that Vitiligo is inheritable.

Michael’s kids actually look like him and some of the members of his family. Blanket, his last son is the only one who doesn’t need comparisons as he looks very much like Michael.

Paris looks like Michael’s sister, Latoya at a young age

Prince looks like Michael’s grandfather, Samuel Jackson.

It is important to know that Michael’s grandmother, (Joe Jackson’s mother is white) and a maternal grandfather who had a biracial mother and biracial father. His maternal grandmother is Indian and paternal grandfather is also almost pure Indian. Michael’s father had light eyes and light skin.so you can imagine what children from this ancestry would look like especially when they themselves are also biracial.

It is simply impossible to have black or normal looking Biracial children when he himself has such mixed roots. The combination of Debbie Rowe’s white gene and white gene from Michael’s gene pool makes his children more white than black.


The Jackson 5

Motown Records president Berry Gordy, Jr., was impressed with the group and signed them in 1969. Sporting the loudest fashions, the largest Afros, the snappiest choreography, and a youthful, soulful exuberance, the Jackson 5 became an immediate success. They scored four consecutive number one pop hits with “I Want You Back,” “ABC,” “The Love You Save,” and “I’ll Be There” in 1970. With Michael topping the pop charts as a solo performer with “Ben” and reaching number two with “Rockin’ Robin,” and with the Jackson 5 producing trendsetting dance tracks such as “Dancing Machine,” the family’s string of hits for Motown lasted through 1975. As Michael matured, his voice changed, family tensions arose, and a contract standoff ensued. The group finally broke with Motown, moving to Epic Records as the Jacksons. Jermaine remained at Motown as a solo performer and was replaced by his youngest brother, Randy Jackson (in full Steven Randall Jackson b. October 29, 1961). As a recording act, the Jacksons enjoyed consistent success through 1984, and their sister Janet Jackson embarked on her own singing career in the early 1980s however, Michael’s solo albums took on an entirely different status.


Is the Michael Jackson skin pigmentation disease realistic? - Biology

MAYWOOD, Ill. About 1 million Americans suffer a skin disorder called vitiligo, which causes unsightly white patches on the face, hands and other parts of the body.

A Loyola University Hospital researcher has won a five-year, $1.7 million federal grant to investigate a new way to treat vitiligo. This research also could point the way to new treatments for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

Vitiligo appears to be an auto-immune disease, in which the immune system goes into overdrive and kills pigment cells, which give skin its color. Loyola researcher Caroline Le Poole, PhD, is studying how to stop vitiligo. The goal is to adjust the immune system so that it stops attacking pigment cells. Conversely, melanoma would be treated by revving up the immune system to attack malignant pigment cells.

"Things we learn from vitiligo could apply to melanoma, and vice versa," Le Poole said. Le Poole is an associate professor in the Oncology Institute of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Although melanoma accounts for less than 5 percent of skin cancers, it is responsible for most of the skin cancer deaths. There will be more than 62,000 new melanoma cases in the United States this year, and more than 8,000 deaths, the American Cancer Society said.

Vitiligo (vit-ill-EYE-go) affects about 0.5 percent of the world's population. It affects both sexes and all races. However, "the darker the skin, the more noticeable it is," said Loyola dermatologist Dr. Anthony Peterson, an assistant professor at Stritch. "The contrast is what people notice."

In the most common form of vitiligo, white patches form on both sides of the body. In 1993, singer Michael Jackson told Oprah Winfrey he has symptoms consistent with vitiligo. Last year, Lee Thomas, an African American TV anchor/reporter in Detroit, published a memoir about vitiligo titled "Turning White."

Vitiligo also can be distressing to Caucasians. Cathy Kalnicky, 47, has had vitiligo since she was 30. It's on her face, arms, legs and hands. The patches are more noticeable during the summer, when Kalnicky develops a deep tan while watching her three daughters play softball. "I get a lot of questions when I'm out in public," she said. "And some occasional stares."

Kalnicky, a registered nurse at Loyola, has provided skin cell samples for Le Poole's research. "It would be really nice if there was a way to stop vitiligo," Kalnicky said.

Steroid creams return some color to affected skin. But this treatment also thins the skin, and can cause streaks or lines. Bright lights, similar to tanning booths, also can return color, but can cause sunburns and other side effects. Skin grafts transfer skin from unaffected areas to the white patches, but can be painful and expensive, Peterson said.

None of the existing treatments prevent vitiligo from progressing. But the approach Le Poole is studying potentially could stop vitiligo in its tracks.

In people who are susceptible to vitiligo, an injury to the skin, such as sunburn, can trigger pigment cells to generate stress proteins. Immune cells absorb these proteins and, in turn, signal killer T cells to destroy pigment cells.

Le Poole hopes to throw a wrench into this overactive immune response. In collaboration with Assay Designs, Inc. of Ann Arbor, Mi., she is developing blockers that would stop immune cells from absorbing stress hormones and triggering the immune response.

"An active immune response can be bad for vitiligo patients, but good for melanoma patients," Le Poole said. "We hope to be able to adjust the immune system in ways that would benefit both groups of patients."


Vitiligo Explained

Of the many skin conditions which could affect anyone of us, few cause anxiety as Vitiligo. It is important to note, however, that the condition is nothing but harmless discolouration of the skin. It would be helpful to gain a closer understanding, in order to dispel some of the myths and fears surrounding vitiligo, and also to arrive at a realistic acceptance of the condition.

When skin loses colour

Vitiligo is a condition in which the skin loses its normal colour and white patches develop. This could occur anywhere on the body, and most people with vitiligo have white patches in multiple areas. Vitiligo can be localised to a few body areas or generalized as a widely distributed loss of colour.

How vitiligo occurs

Our skin normally contains melanocytes, or pigment cells, which are more or less evenly distributed and produce the melanin that gives the skin its characteristic colour. What happens in vitiligo is that melanocytes are destroyed, resulting in the loss of colour, leaving the area white.

What causes vitiligo?

The exact cause of vitiligo is not known. Medical research has not yet put a finger on what precisely sets off the destruction of melanocytes. However, multiple theories exist – a prominent one being that it is an autoimmune disease. Your body’s immune system mistakenly attacks some part of your own body in this case, setting out to destroy the melanocytes.

It is believed is that some individuals happen to be genetically more susceptible to autoimmune diseases, which could then be triggered by environmental factors.

“Am I at risk for vitiligo?”

Globally, about 1% of people are affected by vitiligo. In most cases, vitiligo develops early in life, between the ages of 10 and 30 years. Ninety-five percent of those affected will develop it before 40. Vitiligo doesn’t discriminate by gender nor by race, although loss of pigmentation is more noticeable on darker skin.

Risk factors include the presence of an autoimmune disease, such as thyroid disease (hyper and hypothyroidism), alopecia areata, or pernicious anemia. Family history is a factor too, although it does not follow that children of a parent with vitiligo will necessarily develop it.

Vitiligo commonly affects sun-exposed areas, body folds (such as armpits), previous sites of injury, areas around moles, or areas around body openings. Vitiligo can also affect the eyelids, hair, and mucous lining inside the mouth and nose.

How vitiligo progresses

Symptoms often include rapid pigment loss on several areas of the skin. A stable period may follow, without any progression of the condition. Later on, further cycles of pigment loss and stability may be observed.

Typically, both sides of the body are involved. It is rare for melanin pigment to spontaneously return once the white patches have developed.

Vitiligo is classified into two main types: segmental and non-segmental. Most cases are non-segmental, affecting both body sides and typically increase in coverage over time. About 10% of cases are segmental, meaning they mostly involve one side of the body and do not typically grow with time. Segmental vitiligo is far more prevalent in the teenage years.

Clinical diagnosis of vitiligo is initially made by physical examination and confirmed by histo-pathological examination of a skin biopsy.

Not all cases of pigmentation loss are instances of vitiligo. Differential diagnosis includes multiple skin conditions with similar symptoms.

How is vitiligo treated?

There is no known way to prevent or arrest the process of melanocyte destruction and pigmentation loss. However, several methods can be used to improve the appearance of skin severely affected by vitiligo including topical corticosteroid and calcineurin inhibitors to darken the light patches, re-pigmentation using ultraviolet light therapy, and skin grafting. At a non-clinical level, there’s always the option of skin camouflage with make-up and other cosmetics. For those with light skin, sunscreen and makeup can be all that is typically recommended.

A combination of treatments generally has better outcomes.

Another approach is to even out skin tone by depigmenting unaffected skin areas with hydroquinone to lighten them. A permanent and vigorous removal of all the skin pigment can be achieved with monobenzone. Sun-safety must be adhered to for life to avoid severe sun burn and melanomas. Depigmentation takes about a year to complete. Yes, this is what Michael Jackson underwent.

New biological treatments are currently under investigation and look promising. Janus kinase inhibitors are emerging as a potential treatment option for alopecia areata, eczema, and vitiligo. However, they have not yet been approved for use in dermatologic conditions.

While as dermatologists we do our best to intervene and manage the visual appearance of vitiligo, we have observed that there is no better approach than confidence, information about the condition and a realistic approach to take vitiligo for what it is: a pigmentation condition that is not infectious and does no harm whatsoever. In fact, in the world of fashion, some models with vitiligo like Winnie Harlow, are flaunting it beautifully. And so should everyone else.


Watch the video: Michael Jackson talking about his skin disease Vitiligo (May 2022).


Comments:

  1. Nagar

    Not an expert?

  2. Nijas

    bravo, the excellent answer.

  3. Jarett

    Well done, what a phrase ..., the wonderful idea

  4. Mikalkis

    not so cool



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